Children

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Jo Geirnaert
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Children

Post by Jo Geirnaert »

My sons birthday.I'll be a grandfather in a few months.

i'll sail Jessica(Cirrus) to the end of the world &beyond.Isn't it a non boating topic?
nigel.cottam
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Post by nigel.cottam »

It is indeed!

I'm one already (6 of them plus one on the way). I have always wanted a 'proper' small cruiser of my own and now, on retirement, have one. The grandchildren provided the 'excuse' and I'm looking forward to gradually and gently introducing them to sailing. We will be sailing in the Lake District, not the sea.

Their ages are from 10 down to 2 and I would greatly appreciate any ideas or advice on safety for children on boats that anyone would care to share please. Safety netting on the guard wires is, presumably, a must.

Thanks, Nigel C.
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philipstevens
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Post by philipstevens »

Our grand-daughter was one at the end of March, and when the family come down from Hertfordshire this summer, the lifejacket already awaits in her bedroom here.
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nigel.cottam
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Post by nigel.cottam »

Thanks for the lifejacket reminder Philip, now have one ready for when I eventually get the boat in the water.

What are the views on harnessing young children (2/3 yrs old) in the cockpit?

Regards, Nigel C.
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sakean99
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Tie 'em down!

Post by sakean99 »

nigel.cottam wrote:(cut) What are the views on harnessing young children (2/3 yrs old) in the cockpit?
Our kids were 3 & 7 when we first went cruising (as opposed to dinghy sailing). Now we are taking the next generation as well. My main concern is to prevent 'em getting fingers in the sheets/ tackles etc. As long as they stay in the cockpit or cabin there is little benefit in a life jacket. We used a harness to stop 'em roaming, and tended to used lifejackets when rubber ducking to/ from shore or climbing quay ladders, crossing pontoons etc where the key risk is them slipping in the 'oggin. When rough, we set them up in bunks (or on the floor) with loads of toys & put perspex washboards in so we could still see each other.

Keep the cruises short, include "adventures" ashore, shopping/ exploring/ island picnics/ looking for wildlife - anything to interest and stimulate. It's easy at sea, we simply sail up a sheltered beach or anchor in a few feet of water and play in the sand & pools!
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Post by nigel.cottam »

Thanks for the tips, Sakean99. Look forward to trying them next season.

Best wishes, Nigel
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Post by Albert »

There was a book written in the eighties entitled "Sailing with Children", or "Sailing with Children on board" if I remember correctly. Try googling, I am sure you will find it somewhere. Illustrated cover..black and white...possibly an Adlard Coles book...good luck. :D

Kind Regards,

Albert.
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saltydog
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Re: Children

Post by saltydog »

hi all,
this may be an old thread but here at the end of 2008 we still hear regularly of people that do not respect water salt or fresh. :roll: also of murphy's law if it can go "plomp" it will. :? you can drown in a washbasin. kids: rule 1 teach em to swim, 20 yards of doggy paddle will suffice most dunkings, rule 2 life jackets for everyone 2 legs or 4 on board a boat. no one swims well after having a boom wrapped around their skull. last of all: know what to do when it all goes pear shaped. mouth to mouth applied properly works wonders. the last major rule. :!: :!: DO NOT enter the water to save someone unless there is absolutely nothing else left to keep them from drowning. this is underlined in the case of rivers and the sea. if in doubt count the number of dead would be hero's that tried and died..
:( alan..
p.s. i survived and so did the two child victims only because: i was well trained, knew my limits, the rnli, and a lot of luck. :oops:
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Re: Children

Post by Albert »

Additionally...if I may topically interject....harnesses !
Children should be kept within the confines of the cockpit at sea and in port carefully supervised if they have to go on deck.
The little ones are not able to percieve dangers, because according to their frame of reference all is fun. You need to have eyes in the back of your head all the time with them. I remember how several years ago some friends came aboard and brought their two children, a little boy of 7 and a little girl of 8 and a bit. In a blink of an eye the little girl just disappeared and gave us all a hell of a fright. She fell into the cockpit locker trying to hop from one side to the other. This locker has more than full headroom. Fortunately it was full of soft stuff, sailbags, fenders and rope, and she made a soft landing there. She thought it was very funny. I dread to think of the consequences if she had fallen on the kedge anchor or other hard kit kept in there but on this occasion she fell on soft stuff.

They have to be kept away from the gimballed cooker, particularly if it is fitted with electronic ignition.

Children are very curious. Other areas of potential danger are the medicine chest, the bosun's bag, chart instruments such as dividers etc., the verey pistol and flare packs.

Their little fingers must be kept out of the way of ropes, whether under tension or not, fire extinguishers, lighters and the cutlery drawer. :shock:
Albert
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Re: Children

Post by McTheonoe »

Hello

I thought I might try and revive this thread as had my first child last summer (now 10 1/2 months) and bought my first boat (a Pageant) over the winter. So I've started sailing this season after a long gap with my husband who is new to sailing and a baby - I can almost hear you shriek with horror!! I started sailing at the age of 3 months (being born out of season), my sister was just 3 weeks :), so at least there is some experience of babies and boating in the family.

We're starting off slowly pootling around Plymouth and the Tamar, getting to grips with the boat and having a baby on board. So far we've spent a night on board on the mooring and been for a couple of sails across the sound. For the first of these trips Amelie fell asleep shortly after leaving the mooring and woke shortly before we got back to the mooring, for the second she was having far to an exciting time to fall asleep easily and therefore enjoyed a little sailing time, exploring the cockpit.

So far Amelie has survived with a couple of bumps, currently less than the tally she's building at home - but then she's starting to try and walk, so bumps and bruises are inevitable. We've got a lifejacket for trips to and from the boat, a lifeline for the cockpit and a nice compact high chair (it's pretty low actually) for her to sit in - this can go in the cockpit or at the table. We've tried to create a safe space in the focsle with lee cloths, though to be honest this needs some improvement because she is getting more and more active and we designed it when she wasn't that mobile.

I might keep you posted about our latest exploits and injuries!

Ceri
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Re: Children

Post by sakean99 »

Salty Dog & co - sure, stuff can happen, but it happens only rarely & keeping a good eye on them helps. If I'm sailing then Granny or their Mum or Dad watches them. Be prepared to carry at least one passenger to keep an eye on the kids. Never had a real problem in 30 years with 2 generations of kids, but that doesn't mean it won't - I will stay vigilant, but intend to keep enjoying. Make them aware, but don't frighten them - or the Mums & Dads!
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Re: Children

Post by hello sailor »

My daughter was 3 months old when she first went out on our Pageant; for just a trip up the river. But as soon as she was in a child seat in a car, I went down the breakers yard and bought a S/H plastic childseat which I modifed to fit securely in the cockpit; against the cabin bulkhead, facing aft and underneath the sprayhood. Down below I added a removable ply bulkhead between the engine box and the sink unit which effectively made it into a 'play pen' in the quarter berth: She had endless fun 'helping' to do the washing up. And the single cylinder Volvo must have sounded like the heartbeat in the womb! As soon as it was started, she was fast asleep.
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