Heavy weather jib for a Storm OD

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petrel
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Heavy weather jib for a Storm OD

Post by petrel » Tue Dec 16, 2008 8:43 pm

Hi, I've just joined your ranks, having bought SM133. She's beautiful...
She's fitted with a 360sqft genoa which I think makes it to the 150% mark. I like sailing in F5-7 but don't really fancy working with a rolled up genoa - it's not going to set well. So I'd like to take advantage of the sailmakers' winter discounts and buy a heavy weather jib. It would be flat cut, made of heavy duty Dacron and would be fitted to the furling foil before setting off. It will, I hope, roll up well and remove the need to buy a separate storm jib. Can I please ask for the advice of experienced owners on what size of sail to buy?

keiththomas
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Re: Heavy weather jib for a Storm OD

Post by keiththomas » Mon Dec 22, 2008 10:16 pm

You could contact Peter Sanders of Sanders Sails, Lymington who aside from making first class sails at competitve prices is extremely knowledgeable. Peter recently assessed our Oceanlord with a view to resolving the pointing problem we experience once the furling genoa is used in strong winds. Once furled in a blow, the foot of the sail is a considerable distance from the deck and the shape is quite inefficient as you predict will be the case for your Storm.

Peter suggested we consider two additional sails, namely a working jib and a storm sail. Give him a call or send him an e-mail. [We are in the fortunate position of having a removeable inner forestay (not the baby stay) that was fitted for the ARC Race when the boat was launched in 1996.]

I would still be intrigued to know if any Oceanlord owners have invested in such sails and how high they can point to the wind when close hauled in a F7+?

And welcome to the Westerly fraternity!

mikebuggy
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Re: Heavy weather jib for a Storm OD

Post by mikebuggy » Wed Jan 21, 2009 7:21 pm

Ref heavy weather jib for Westerly Storm. I fitted a winter/heavy weather sail to the furler on my Storm. The No 1 genoa was kept for summer time or if there was a good long range forecast. The sail was fairly tall, not far off full height, but narrow on the foot. It was relatively strong and heavy and set very well with the blocks right forward. As the sail set much better than a partly furled genoa, we were just as fast, if not faster, in most conditions, as we had been with the No1. We used to perform better than other storms and fulmars, particularly if they were hard pressed under their genoas. Tacking was far easier than with a full genoa. The only thing you need to watch is that your genoa sheet car tracks are designed for a larger sail. If your new narrow heavy weather jib needs the blocks right forward, even when fully unrolled, then you don't have much scope left for getting the correct sheeting angle when you start to furl it. Before considering having a new sail made look at the stock held by SeaTeach in Emsworth. You can look at their stock on the internet. They have a range of sails to fit most needs at good prices. The sail will need to be a litle heavier than your No 1 but not nearly as heavy as a storm sail. The bolt rope will also need to be the right size for your genoa luffspar. Not a critical point if you intend keeping a sail bent on all summer, but if you're going to be sail changing then it must be a comfortable sliding fit. It is relatively inexpensive for a sailmaker to change the bolt rope on a sail, so its not the end of the world if once you've found the right sail you need to do this. A good yachtsman should consider the furler as primarily a stowing system, with an at-sea reefing facility. You should really carry more than one headsail and rig the appropriate one for the average expected weather before going out.
Good luck!

petrel
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Re: Heavy weather jib for a Storm OD

Post by petrel » Sat Apr 18, 2009 4:47 pm

Many apologies for the long delay in replying..I got pre-occupied with one or two other issues.
Thanks very much to both of you for your thoughts. I will try and do some sailing in F5-7 first and see how the current genoa looks. Looking at the Seateach stock is a v good idea.
Rgds

Albert
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Re: Heavy weather jib for a Storm OD

Post by Albert » Wed Apr 22, 2009 9:43 pm

by petrel on Tue Dec 16, 2008 8:43 pm

Hi, I've just joined your ranks, having bought SM133. She's beautiful...
She's fitted with a 360sqft genoa which I think makes it to the 150% mark. I like sailing in F5-7 but don't really fancy working with a rolled up genoa - it's not going to set well. So I'd like to take advantage of the sailmakers' winter discounts and buy a heavy weather jib. It would be flat cut, made of heavy duty Dacron and would be fitted to the furling foil before setting off. It will, I hope, roll up well and remove the need to buy a separate storm jib. Can I please ask for the advice of experienced owners on what size of sail to buy?petrel

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E-mail

I am very intrigued.
Do you mean undressing the (rolling) forestay and replacing the Genoa with a heavy weather jib ?
Albert

petrel
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Re: Heavy weather jib for a Storm OD

Post by petrel » Sat Apr 25, 2009 10:57 am

yep

Albert
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Re: Heavy weather jib for a Storm OD

Post by Albert » Sat Apr 25, 2009 10:32 pm

So what happens when you meet an unexpected howler ?
Are you happy to struggle with bringing down a genoa down a narrow groove in a pitching sea, and then the rigmarole of stowing the genoa, and then repeating the excercise with a storm jib ? Sod's law the hoist may jam.
All of this in a harness, with the sea filling your boots and the spray going sideways ?
It is not necessary nowadays.There are easier solutions.
Albert

puddock
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Re: Heavy weather jib for a Storm OD

Post by puddock » Wed Aug 12, 2009 11:24 am

"heavy weather jib. It would be flat cut, made of heavy duty Dacron and would be fitted to the furling foil before setting off"

I think the OP suggested that this would be done in port prior to setting out, dependant on forecast. Seems sensible enough.

Albert
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Re: Heavy weather jib for a Storm OD

Post by Albert » Wed Aug 12, 2009 9:40 pm

puddock wrote:"heavy weather jib. It would be flat cut, made of heavy duty Dacron and would be fitted to the furling foil before setting off"

I think the OP suggested that this would be done in port prior to setting out, dependant on forecast. Seems sensible enough.
Are you replying to my post above or just offering a comment ?
Albert

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