ELECTRIC WINCH ON A CORSAIR

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IOLANTHE
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ELECTRIC WINCH ON A CORSAIR

Post by IOLANTHE »

I have a Corsair, 36ft, and am now at the stage where I need winch assistance if I am to continue to sail satisfactorily. I am therefore considering fitting an electric winch.
Is there any owner who has completed such a fit?
I would be very grateful for any advice on a suitable model. Also advice as to where the most productive position is to fit the powered winch bearing in mind any penalties on space below to fit the motor.
Thank you.
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Re: ELECTRIC WINCH ON A CORSAIR

Post by Vegable »

I've an Oceanranger (same hull as a Corsair) and fitted a Lofrens Project 1000. I also have 60 metres of galvanised chain. Frequently the chain piles up and stops the motor from turning and someone has to go to the chain locker and smooth it all out. Whilst it's a bit of a bother it hasn't led to any problems and we anchor a lot. I don't really want to use less chain. Depending on how much chain/rope you use, stowage can be a problem with below deck mounted motors. However it makes a world of difference to easy anchoring and retrieval. I find that in spite of the instructions telling you not to, the winch easily copes with pulling the boat to the anchor except in winds above F5 or so.
I fitted mine myself without any problems. You'll need to work out carefully where you need to fit it rather than where you want to fit it. And you'll need to mount it on a wooden pad so that you seal/hide the holes of the removed manual windlass. I also bought a cheap wireless control unit on ebay (can't remember the price but less than £15.00) mounted the receiver on the outside of, and above the chain locker hatch and I'm able to operate the windlass from anywhere.
Electrically, your best bet is to have a new battery mounted in one of the forward lockers, or very heavy duty cables running from your batteries below the navigators seat
I know that Mike Buggy who contributes on here left his manual windlass in place and sited his electric windlass off to one side so that the chain stows into one of the forward lockers but I'm not sure how he's done that.
All in all, it's very well worth it.
Mike
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Re: ELECTRIC WINCH ON A CORSAIR

Post by aquaplane »

Do you mean a winch or a windlass?

I was sailing with a bloke the other day and he had a rechargable electric winch which I thought a bit pointless as he used the gizmo to do most of the work then did the tweaking with a winch handle.

It might have been one of these : http://www.winchrite.co.uk/
Bob.
Centaur now sold. Boating from Tarbert.
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Re: ELECTRIC WINCH ON A CORSAIR

Post by FulmarOnia »

My Corsair already had an old electric windlass fitted when I bought it this summer, though very old and not very strong. It is an "Above Deck" mounted model which saves space in the anchor locker and is the same arrangement as I previously I installed on my Fulmar. I wouldn't consider anchoring without one!

Above deck mounted is easier and in my view better, a cover of some sort is needed to keep the elements off it though. When fitting a hardwood pad need to be shaped to take up the deck curvature, I didn't find that too difficult on the Fulmar.

On the Corsair the Windlass was powered from the domestic batteries via 25mm cables, which were probably too thin. The big modification I have made since buying the Corsair was to fit a bow-thruster and in so doing a battery was fitted in the forward starboard locker which now powers the windlass as well as the thruster and is charged from the alternator and shore power via 50mm cables.

Whereas a bow-thruster isn't a DIY job I found that fitting a windlass was easily within my self taught DIY skills.

Incidentally it's with looking at this
http://www.boatgeardirect.co.uk/id19.html

It just about meets your spec, assuming you have 8mm chain. Incidentally this company is remarkably good value for chain, warps etc
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Re: ELECTRIC WINCH ON A CORSAIR

Post by Hillary »

I have fitted an electric Windlass to replace a jammed manual windlass on my Centaur. I bought a Quick D 2000 and found that fitting it was not too difficult. The biggest task was filling the old holes in the deck which were covered up by a rotting plywood plinth which supported the manual windlass.

I fitted two Quick deck foot switches and a wireless remote. and I am pleased with the result. I had to remove the headlining in the forward cabin to fit the deck switches and hide the wiring which was a fiddle and I took the opportunity to replace the tatty headlining with new from Trafalgar Marine.

I would say its doable with average DIY skills and some sharp drills.

Good luck
Moonshine, Centaur CR1149
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Re: ELECTRIC WINCH ON A CORSAIR

Post by mikebuggy »

Yes as stated above I've got an electric windlass fitted on the port side deck well fwd. The chain locker for this is under the head of the port fwd bunk. I still have the old chain locker and manual windlass fwd, so effectively I now have port and stbd anchors, although only my main 45lbs CQR is permanently rigged on the bow, attached to the port (powered windlass) cable. The smaller stbd 35 lbs CQR is stowed below. I have deck foot switches, and also cockpit and forecabin switches for the windlass. The windlass motor is accessed below via the fore part of the upper heads medicine cupboard locker.
Re the comment about chain piling up: This is very common on many boats, not just Westerlys. I have produced curing methods for this for friends on several boats. The general principal is that the chain cable needs to be 'disturbed' or 'shaken' regularly during the haul-up process. I do this by having a length of broad U-shaped plastic gutter below the cable entry point into the locker. This hangs downwards at a slight angle from the vertical so the chain lays or slides against it as it is guided and delivered down into the locker. Although the guttering is firmly held in place at its top (deck) end, it is allowed to swing a little lengthwise. It doesnt matter how you do the next bit but the general idea is that a combination of strong bunjee and cordage holds the guide gutter more or less steady in position while a single strong 'shaker' line is taken away from the gutter from somewhere near its lower end. This may be led out of the locker via little sheaves or whatever means you like. You can even have a little loop or handle at the end. I leave my 'shaker line' coiled up ready for use under the locker in the forecabin. It is long enough to operate while standing on the foredeck so that the windlass foot switches can be operated by the same person. When uphauling, set up a constant rhythm, such as bursts of 20 sec hauls interspersed by 3 good shake-pulls on the cord. You will need to see which rhythm works best for you. You can hear the chain pyramid collapsing each time. The line can also be extended back to the cockpit.
Note that it is not considered good seamanship to haul the boat to the anchor. The windlass is intended for lifting the cable and anchor, not for towing your boat. Where possible you should try to follow the 'lay of the anchor' and drive the boat down that. You will need to do that in stages, stopping each time to take up the slack. You will prematurely age the brushes, contactors, and main fuse if you over-strain the windlass by hauling.
As for electric winches (rather than windlasses), I have come across one fitted on a Corsair...the main halyard starboard winch. Plenty of room and an easy but very expensive installation. As someone already posted, there are also rechargeable handheld winch-driver gizmos available as well. Quite good apparently.
IOLANTHE
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Re: ELECTRIC WINCH ON A CORSAIR

Post by IOLANTHE »

Thank you for your replies.
I am sorry if I was less than specific. I am seeking advice on fitting an electric winch in the cockpit area to assist with Genoa sheeting and halyard operation. For instance, my wife can no longer get me to the top of the mast. What I am unsure about is
a. Where is the best site for a single electric winch. Replace one of the existing sheet winches or site it on the cabin roof.
b. What size of winch? 40 or 46?
c. Any recommendation on make or model.

I am very grateful for any assistance as it is a big decision.
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Re: ELECTRIC WINCH ON A CORSAIR

Post by Jolly Roger »

May I suggest a different solution to an electric winch in the cockpit.

To climb the mast, why not consider a mast climbing device like a mast climber. Have a look at what is available https://www.google.co.uk/?client=firefo ... mber+yacht. It should cosy you less than a quarter the cost of an electric winch (before fitting). These are what singlehanded sailors use.

For genoa sheeting it may be easier to train your wife to helm the boat through the tack and you winch. You could also upgrade your winches to some thing more powerful, e.g. a Lewmar 43 to a Lewmar 48. You will sell the old winches on eBay to defray some of the cost. Another solution would be to purchase a WinchRite http://www.winchrite.co.uk/.

Hope these suggestions help.
Roger
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Re: ELECTRIC WINCH ON A CORSAIR

Post by Vegable »

Oops! :oops: It's not often I'm right, but this time I'm wrong!
Whilst not having an electric winch I do have a Winchrite Handle. It was got so that SWMBO could help to winch in the sheets. She and my friends on board love it. And as I have in mast reefing and furling genoa, relieves the amount of rope pulling when coming into harbour. It is also powerful enough to hoist a man up the mast using the slow speed of a two speed winch. On a days sailing it's never run out of battery power either.
But, there is a lot of torque on it when hardenning the sheets. So much so there is a danger of wrist injury if you're not careful and fully aware when using it. They're not cheap either at around 500GBP but cheaper than an electric winch. On a personal level I don't use it preferring to "feel" what's happenning to the rope I'm winching. However being 70 next birthday this attitude might change!
I have played with an electric winch on a 70' yacht and it was impressive, but you have to watch what you're winching very carefully as the power will easily rip a snagged sail!
Mike
"There is nothing worse than running ashore, unless you are uncertain as to which continent that shore belongs"
IOLANTHE
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Re: ELECTRIC WINCH ON A CORSAIR

Post by IOLANTHE »

Thanks to everyone who took the time to responded to my post, most useful.
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