storm sail

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spycatcher
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storm sail

Post by spycatcher » Mon Mar 04, 2013 6:31 pm

Hi,

i found a storm sail in one of the lockers when i bought my centaur, not sure how to rig it though, i have a self furling genoa on it at the mo

any suggestions :) thanks

i just found loads of stuff on this on another site, it all seems very complicated, maybe i'll just stay in the harbour :)

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Re: storm sail

Post by Vegable » Fri Mar 15, 2013 6:14 pm

Is it a storm mainsail or a storm jib. If it's a jib, have a look at the storm sail and see if it has a rope luff or bolts for hanking on. If it has bolts it's of no use to you with your present set up. If it has a rope luff then it is of some use but with provisos!
Picture yourself cold, miserable, wet, and frightened up on the foredeck with a near gale blowing, you can't hear yourself think with the wind shrieking in the rigging, and stormy seas are washing over you. Your boat is bouncing around all over the place and you are having the greatest difficulty staying upright. The reason that you're up there is that you've been caught out by the weather and the wind is rising to a dangerous level and you've got to reduce your sail. You now have to lower your furling genoa out of the roller reefing foil, safely lash the collapsed wildly flogging and flapping sail to the safety rails and pulpit then carefully thread your storm jib up the foil, haul it up, and somehow rethread the jib sheets back to the cockpit.
If it's a storm mainsail, then you hve to collapse the mainsail and rig up the storm sail tying on the haliards, and the foot and the clew in the same conditions. Some boats have a foil mounted on the side of the mast and dedicated haliards and sheets for ease of fastenning.
This is the practicality of using storm sails and suprisingly enough the vast majority of storm sails never see the light of day. If you are going to intentionally go out in wild weathers then you need a double foil on your roller reefing, or install a removable forestay and dedicated jib sheets and tracks.
Storm jibs also need to be set at least 1 metre above the deck so that the waves washing over the bow don't hit the jib and swing the boat round.
Personally I watch the weather like a hawk all the time I'm out and if I need to use a storm sail it's for emergency cover whilst I'm walking to and from the pub!
Mike
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Re: storm sail

Post by smudger » Sat Mar 16, 2013 11:16 am

Hi,if the storm jib is a hank on then you may get away with using the baby stay and hauling up on the spinny halyard,try it on a calmer day 8)

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Re: storm sail

Post by rhumlady » Sat Mar 16, 2013 9:53 pm

The baby stay isn't reinforced at the lower end to take a storm jib.
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Re: storm sail

Post by spycatcher » Fri Mar 29, 2013 5:40 pm

thanks guys that's a lot for me to think about

its a storm jib and has clipon things that could fit on the baby stay but if its not reinforced !!!

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Re: storm sail

Post by budgester » Fri Aug 23, 2013 9:13 am

I have a similar thing, on my Griffon.

Boat came with a storm jib with brass piston hanks, the forestay is roller furling.

The baby stay has nothing at the bottom where you could connect the tack of the sail.

So I'm gonna see this weekend if I can run on of the spare halyards to the foot of the forestay, and then hank the storm jib onto that
to be honest I'm not that hopeful as the halyards are all 10mm and I'm not sure the hanks are big enough.

Anymore ideas ? What is the feasibility of putting on a removeable forestay ?
Is there any point of having a storm sail on board if it can't be used...

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Re: storm sail

Post by rhumlady » Fri Aug 23, 2013 10:22 am

That would depend on the type of sailing you are doing and if you believe you may get caught out in a bad blow. Most of us avoid sailing if the forecast is for bad weather but sometimes it is unavoidable. I have a storm jib but have never tried it and don't carry it on board as I am never more than a couple of hours from shelter when on passage.
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Re: storm sail

Post by budgester » Fri Aug 23, 2013 4:02 pm

So basically if I'm having to ask the question, then make sure I don't sail in weather where I'm ever likely to use it.

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Re: storm sail

Post by petrel » Sun Sep 01, 2013 12:11 pm

I asked a sail maker to make up a sleeve that wraps around the furled up genoa; it has "D" fittings to match the piston hanks on the luff of the mainsail. It worked well when I practised using it in harbour, but have never used it for real.
The copper-bottomed solution is to fit a removable inner forestay with a tensioner. You will need specialist advice on where to attach it: the stemhead fitting might not be designed to take the load anywhere other than where the genoa halyard already attaches....in which case you'll need to create a new strong attachment point on deck, bolted through to a bulkhead underneath the deck. So all this hassle and expense didn't make sense to me, in the context of sailing trips of maximum 15-16 hours when the weather forecast should still be accurate enough.

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