Sealord Owners

Post Reply
Albert
Posts: 171
Joined: Sat May 12, 2007 9:48 pm
Anti Spam measure: No
AntiSpam Text: ideasnot
Location: Gibraltar.

Sealord Owners

Post by Albert » Wed Aug 29, 2007 2:19 pm

Ahoy there !

Only 42 of these wonderful dreadnoughts were built by Westerly.

I had the last one ever built, the SD42 Selina Red duster which I sold several years ago and this year have bought another one SD31 Vintage with teak decks, US Flag which I will re flag to a Blue duster.

I am very interested for this to be a thread for discussion among exclusively Sealord owners worldwide.

I know there are several in the Med, in the UK, in France, and one I believe in Chile and one I believe in Australia.

It would be fun to create an informal Sealord Register since there are so few, so where are they all nowadays ?
Albert

User avatar
philipstevens
Posts: 1024
Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2006 5:10 pm
Anti Spam measure: Yes
AntiSpam Text: Westerly
Location: Home Nr. Saint Ives, Cornwall.

Post by philipstevens » Wed Aug 29, 2007 2:56 pm

There are 10 listed in last years' year book. This years' book is on the boat.
regards,
Philip.
Moderator and Admin.

Previous owner of Konsort Duo, Oyster, KD22

Join the WOA - only £15 per year (UK) http://www.westerly-owners.co.uk/ab_join.php

http://www.marketmechina.com/ & http://www.celticwebdesign.net

Albert
Posts: 171
Joined: Sat May 12, 2007 9:48 pm
Anti Spam measure: No
AntiSpam Text: ideasnot
Location: Gibraltar.

Post by Albert » Wed Aug 29, 2007 4:27 pm

philipstevens wrote:There are 10 listed in last years' year book. This years' book is on the boat.
Hello Phil, how interesting. Mine is not in the book. That leaves 31.

I have recently heard that SD2 has come on to the market, apparently US register. I will post details when I know more.

I would very much like for us to create a list it would be so interesting and so much fun.
Albert

User avatar
rhumlady
Posts: 678
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2006 9:26 pm
Anti Spam measure: No
AntiSpam Text: westerly
Location: Clyde area

Post by rhumlady » Thu Aug 30, 2007 9:13 pm

I believe Highland Sealord is a charter boat out of the Oban area. Used to see her regularly at Tobermory among other places.

Derek
Konsort 'Rhumlady'

Albert
Posts: 171
Joined: Sat May 12, 2007 9:48 pm
Anti Spam measure: No
AntiSpam Text: ideasnot
Location: Gibraltar.

Post by Albert » Thu Aug 30, 2007 10:20 pm

rhumlady wrote:I believe Highland Sealord is a charter boat out of the Oban area. Used to see her regularly at Tobermory among other places.

Derek
Konsort 'Rhumlady'
Yes, I now remember seeing her featured in an ad for charters.

If you spot her, will you take note of the sail number and post it here please, when you can. Thanks.
Albert

User avatar
rhumlady
Posts: 678
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2006 9:26 pm
Anti Spam measure: No
AntiSpam Text: westerly
Location: Clyde area

Post by rhumlady » Fri Aug 31, 2007 8:45 pm

Ok but it maybe a year or so as we are out of the water for a major refit at persent.
Derek

Albert
Posts: 171
Joined: Sat May 12, 2007 9:48 pm
Anti Spam measure: No
AntiSpam Text: ideasnot
Location: Gibraltar.

Post by Albert » Fri Aug 31, 2007 9:26 pm

rhumlady wrote:Ok but it maybe a year or so as we are out of the water for a major refit at persent.
Derek
Nothing serious I hope.

I have heard there is a Konsort Duo not far away from my Sealord. I am told it causes a lot of interest when out of the water. People stop to look and discuss the twin keels and take pictures.
Albert

Frank
Posts: 13
Joined: Sun Jun 18, 2006 1:00 pm
Anti Spam measure: Yes
AntiSpam Text: Opposite Easterly
Location: Chile

Re: Sealord Owners

Post by Frank » Thu Sep 13, 2007 10:04 am

Albert wrote: one I believe in Chile and one I believe in Australia.

so where are they all nowadays ?
Nil in Australia ( that was my boat), one in Chile one in Argentina....last week there were two in Argentina, none in Chile.

'Brilliance, SD4(?) owned by Mike ? ( my yearbook is not with me just now) is currently on a mooring in Ushuaia, she went from there up to Pto Montt and back singlehanded in 2005/2006.

'Westerly Serenade, SD35, is my boat...she is currently alongside 'Club de Yates Micalvi' in Pto Williams, Chile about 25 miles from Ushuaia. Came across from NZ in early 2004, since then 7000 Patagonian channel miles including twice round the Horn, once W-E and once E-W .

Some photos that may or may not be of interest at http://www.panoramio.com/user/55032

Art Pettersen
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Dec 22, 2006 7:59 pm
Anti Spam measure: Yes
AntiSpam Text: Opposite Easterly
Location: Seattle WA USA

registry

Post by Art Pettersen » Sat Sep 15, 2007 1:47 am

I just purchased, what I believe is SD34 in San Diego, I'll have to check, and now she is homeported in Seattle. I have race for my years on the west coast and I was very surprised at how nicely she sails for such a heavy girl. It is going to take me a couple of years to get her back in shape. It seams that many people don't have the pride of ownership that I do and they just let the boats go. Great boat can't say enough about her...

The next haulout she is getting a maxi prop, that is going to save me alot of headaches.

Cheers
Art Pettersen

Albert
Posts: 171
Joined: Sat May 12, 2007 9:48 pm
Anti Spam measure: No
AntiSpam Text: ideasnot
Location: Gibraltar.

Re: Sealord Owners

Post by Albert » Mon Sep 17, 2007 10:15 pm

Frank wrote:
Albert wrote: one I believe in Chile and one I believe in Australia.

so where are they all nowadays ?
Nil in Australia ( that was my boat), one in Chile one in Argentina....last week there were two in Argentina, none in Chile.

'Brilliance, SD4(?) owned by Mike ? ( my yearbook is not with me just now) is currently on a mooring in Ushuaia, she went from there up to Pto Montt and back singlehanded in 2005/2006.

'Westerly Serenade, SD35, is my boat...she is currently alongside 'Club de Yates Micalvi' in Pto Williams, Chile about 25 miles from Ushuaia. Came across from NZ in early 2004, since then 7000 Patagonian channel miles including twice round the Horn, once W-E and once E-W .

Some photos that may or may not be of interest at http://www.panoramio.com/user/55032
Gosh ! Hello...there you are !

I had heard rumours, but it is true after all.

Very nice to make contact with you.

I see she has treadmaster decks and a pole. Nice Boat !

The pictures are breathtaking. It emboldens any Sealord owner to try ice navigation now.. :D

What engine do you have, by the way ?

Let's keep in contact.

I have just sold my house in the UK and going to Gibraltar soon, it is my home port. My grandad built it before the turn of the century, took 6 years, with 17,000 labour. Currently my boat is in the USA undergoing refit. I will be sailing her across the pond earlly next year and reflagging to a blue ensign. Will keep posting. Nice to hear from you.
Albert

Albert
Posts: 171
Joined: Sat May 12, 2007 9:48 pm
Anti Spam measure: No
AntiSpam Text: ideasnot
Location: Gibraltar.

Re: registry

Post by Albert » Mon Sep 17, 2007 10:26 pm

Art Pettersen wrote:I just purchased, what I believe is SD34 in San Diego, I'll have to check, and now she is homeported in Seattle. I have race for my years on the west coast and I was very surprised at how nicely she sails for such a heavy girl. It is going to take me a couple of years to get her back in shape. It seams that many people don't have the pride of ownership that I do and they just let the boats go. Great boat can't say enough about her...

The next haulout she is getting a maxi prop, that is going to save me alot of headaches.

Cheers
Hello Art, always nice to hear from a member of this very exclusive club.. :D

Does she have teak decks or treadmaster ?

What engine do you carry ?

You will find her to be stiff and very reliable, and she likes a blow rather than a light breeze...and off she goes...with a bone in her teeth and a tail in her wake. She needs a 4 or a 5 to get going, and anything higher is a plus.

You say you are going to change the prop. So am I. My prop is a three blade 17 and a half tip diameter LH prop, standard.

I am having an 18" Brunton's fitted. You really ought to consider a Bruntons in preference to any other. Faster, better performance under sail, silent. It is the business, I tell you, and not expensive for what it is.

Please stay in touch. I am very interested in everything Sealord, and having contact with Sealord owners.

One day we may even have a rally.. :D
Albert

Frank
Posts: 13
Joined: Sun Jun 18, 2006 1:00 pm
Anti Spam measure: Yes
AntiSpam Text: Opposite Easterly
Location: Chile

Re: Sealord Owners

Post by Frank » Tue Sep 18, 2007 3:42 am

Albert wrote:
Gosh ! Hello...there you are !

I had heard rumours, but it is true after all.

Very nice to make contact with you.

I see she has treadmaster decks and a pole. Nice Boat !

The pictures are breathtaking. It emboldens any Sealord owner to try ice navigation now.. :D

What engine do you have, by the way ?
Hola Albert, I had been trying to get a mate of mine to buy that teak decked Sealord in the US...seems the duffer lost his chance.

Ice navigation not for the faint of heart...navigation from Melinka south is daylight only due to the danger of hitting stuff ( logs..ice) . In the winter days are short and when moving anchorage you need to factor in the possibility that if the chosen anchorage is iced up you will have time to get to another which you hope won't be...and that it won't be full of crab boats but they are normally pretty good and let you raft up.

The treadmaster is now very shaby...essentially frd of the mast... glue failure and stuff in patches...happened over the last few years.

Engine is an MD17D....blew a head gasket while coming south last time due to hardening and failure of the copper pipe on the FW side that comes down from the header tank if that makes sense.. I am fitting an audible temp alarm next time over there... replaced all the gaskets while alongside Micalvi in early August.

Another thing that happened to both Brilliance and my boat was the failure of the calorifier... small cracks etc on the seams on the pressure vessel. I had mine patched in Pto Montt but it went terminal a week before Williams.

Maybe the calorifier is a thing for all Sealord owners to watch for...an item where preventive maintenance/replacement is called for is called for.

Poles?, she has two but just now I have no spinnaker... after 2 x 24 hour spinnaker runs down in the high 40s on the way from NZ it blew out and I have yet to replace it, maybe when I next head for the sun.

Good to hear from you Albert,
Salud

Albert
Posts: 171
Joined: Sat May 12, 2007 9:48 pm
Anti Spam measure: No
AntiSpam Text: ideasnot
Location: Gibraltar.

Re: Sealord Owners

Post by Albert » Tue Sep 18, 2007 6:03 pm

Frank wrote:
Albert wrote:
Gosh ! Hello...there you are !

I had heard rumours, but it is true after all.

Very nice to make contact with you.

I see she has treadmaster decks and a pole. Nice Boat !

The pictures are breathtaking. It emboldens any Sealord owner to try ice navigation now.. :D

What engine do you have, by the way ?
Hola Albert, I had been trying to get a mate of mine to buy that teak decked Sealord in the US...seems the duffer lost his chance.

Ice navigation not for the faint of heart...navigation from Melinka south is daylight only due to the danger of hitting stuff ( logs..ice) . In the winter days are short and when moving anchorage you need to factor in the possibility that if the chosen anchorage is iced up you will have time to get to another which you hope won't be...and that it won't be full of crab boats but they are normally pretty good and let you raft up.

The treadmaster is now very shaby...essentially frd of the mast... glue failure and stuff in patches...happened over the last few years.

Engine is an MD17D....blew a head gasket while coming south last time due to hardening and failure of the copper pipe on the FW side that comes down from the header tank if that makes sense.. I am fitting an audible temp alarm next time over there... replaced all the gaskets while alongside Micalvi in early August.

Another thing that happened to both Brilliance and my boat was the failure of the calorifier... small cracks etc on the seams on the pressure vessel. I had mine patched in Pto Montt but it went terminal a week before Williams.

Maybe the calorifier is a thing for all Sealord owners to watch for...an item where preventive maintenance/replacement is called for is called for.

Poles?, she has two but just now I have no spinnaker... after 2 x 24 hour spinnaker runs down in the high 40s on the way from NZ it blew out and I have yet to replace it, maybe when I next head for the sun.

Good to hear from you Albert,
Salud
Well, I bagged it.

This Sealord was in a creek, in Annapolis, Maryland, and had not been moved for more than a year because the owner had moved and had bought another boat etc.,

The prospect of buying a boat with teak decks frightens most prospective owners witless because if the deck is not laid down properly to replace it is a huge job first because all the deck fittings have to be removed which is very labour intensive and so the excercise potentially is very costly, and we are talking of £ sterling 20,000 plus.

It is the case that this problem is most prevalent with Oceanlords.

The reason is that Westerly Yachts at a later stage decided to contract out the fitting of teak decks which has not proved to be satisfactory, as these later fittings are thinner than the former which were done by Westerly "in house". At the time of construction, early 1980's through to late eighties the cost of a teak deck as an extra was just over £6000.

To cut a long story short, the Westerly fitted "in house" teak decks were properly made and bonded and are 8 millimeters thick.

The outsourced teak decks are thinner, and hence vulnerable.

I have only just last week spoken to someone who experienced going aboard a vessel fitted with outsourced teak decks on a rainy day and wherever he walked he said the deck squirted water vertically..oh dear !

Of course these rumours are enough to frighten the living daylights out of prospective buyers and even surveyors who have to err on the side of professional prudence when making the survey report.

Now you are probably beginning to guess I am very familiar with the Sealord 39 and you are right.

This boat having been kept in a creek was not a wise move by the previous owner, because by doing so it severely limited the number of viewers prepared to make the journey instead of having it in a marina with ready access and never mind the cost.

Also the greying of the decks frightened off a lot of people because she does need re seaming, but the teak is in perfect order otherwise, no splits or cracks or warping or lifting, amazing.

So the negotiations were done by email and telephone over a period of three months and toing and froing of photographs etc., and then without seeing her, I paid a deposit and booked a flight to go over and do the survey myself, as I had SD 42 and know exactly what to look for.

And so the survey took 4 hours and at the end of it I was satisfied and closed the deal and she became mine.

The marvel is that throughout the Westerly years I accumulated a vast inventory of spare parts for my first one, and when I sold her, I did so stripped. So apart from having a very complete inventory, I have six crates here 2 feet by 2 feet by 2 feet crammed with Sealord parts.

The second marvel is that I have all the bits that are missing from the current inventory. It is as if you have a jigsaw puzzle and all the missing bits are at hand, an absolute miracle ! Everything the boat did not have at the time of sale, I have either crated, or in my loft.

Also you know about Westerly Headliner Droop... :D ...which is caused by the wrong glue being used origninally by the yard, a glue that melts in heat and then the headliner collapses......

Of course, to someone not familiar with this Westerly Phenomenon...including a surveyor.... :D ....it looks from the inside as if the teak decks are leaking and causing the headliner to droop, and this again reinforces the fear of the teak decks as I explain above.

These are cosmetic factors that frighten people off, but you will agree with me that Sealords are True Dreadnoughts... :D ...overbuilt,,,overengineered....and over qualified....and super beasts.

And then, the occasional wear on the cherry stripe floor because of children scuffling about and the odd uneaten and refused sandwich in a locker also helps to frighten the fainthearted and the uninfomed... :D

And so, she is in a yard at the moment, having some work done on her to make her properly seaworthy to cross the pond, because, for the past 8 years she has been used a sort of weekend flat afloat for a family with children and only sailed in an inland sea where it is customary for the moment the wind reaches force 5, for nearly every single boat to be returned to its mooring immediately, so she has not, according to what I can percieve, been driven hard at all, and what is more, all the original stuff is intact.

I admire your navigation in iced waters immensely. I studied the theory in Merchant Navy College, and the closest I have ever got to practising it was in the Baltic on a 17,000 ton ship in which I sailed as Third, but of course nothing serious, very thin ice and no need for even an icebreaker.
Hats off, I am truly impressed. Of course, dealing with growlers, or hummocking or sheet is a very different proposition in a merchant ship and you have made me think deeply of what could be done with a Sealord.

I have am MD 17 D engine too. These were fitted as standard, and later models were fitted with the 2003 T Turbo, a very delicate engine compared to the MD 17 D which is a real workhorse and has stood the test of time.
The Volvo agent in the Hamble tells me they are now "getting a bit thin on the ground", but there is no problem with parts or reconditioning etc.,

Mine blows a bit of white smoke, even at lower revs.

It probably is the injectors. I will have it seen to at launching.

But it starts immediately and is very smooth running. It is being reversed from left hand to right hand because I am fitting a Bruntons self feathering propeller which apparently "likes" RH rather than LH on fin keeled boats for no apparent reason. It will increase the hull speed by 1 to 1.5 knots under sail and no whirring noises.. :D ...and little or no stuffing box wear.. :D

This is the first time I have heard of the calorifier giving trouble. Do you think it may be due to climate / Temperature ?

Very interesting to hear from you. Let us all keep in touch.

Saludos Cordiales,

Albert

(Alberto el Esperto. :lol: )
Albert

Frank
Posts: 13
Joined: Sun Jun 18, 2006 1:00 pm
Anti Spam measure: Yes
AntiSpam Text: Opposite Easterly
Location: Chile

Re: Sealord Owners

Post by Frank » Tue Sep 18, 2007 9:50 pm

Albert wrote:
Frank wrote:
Albert wrote:
I have only just last week spoken to someone who experienced going aboard a vessel fitted with outsourced teak decks on a rainy day and wherever he walked he said the deck squirted water vertically..oh dear !


Also you know about Westerly Headliner Droop... :D ...which is caused by the wrong glue being used origninally by the yard, a glue that melts in heat and then the headliner collapses......

Of course, to someone not familiar with this Westerly Phenomenon...including a surveyor.... :D ....it looks from the inside as if the teak decks are leaking and causing the headliner to droop, and this again reinforces the fear of the teak decks as I explain above.


I admire your navigation in iced waters immensely. I studied the theory in Merchant Navy College, and the closest I have ever got to practising it was in the Baltic on a 17,000 ton ship in which I sailed as Third, but of course nothing serious, very thin ice and no need for even an icebreaker.
Hats off, I am truly impressed. Of course, dealing with growlers, or hummocking or sheet is a very different proposition in a merchant ship and you have made me think deeply of what could be done with a Sealord.

I have am MD 17 D engine too. These were fitted as standard, and later models were fitted with the 2003 T Turbo, a very delicate engine compared to the MD 17 D which is a real workhorse and has stood the test of time.
The Volvo agent in the Hamble tells me they are now "getting a bit thin on the ground", but there is no problem with parts or reconditioning etc.,

Mine blows a bit of white smoke, even at lower revs.

It probably is the injectors. I will have it seen to at launching.

But it starts immediately and is very smooth running. It is being reversed from left hand to right hand because I am fitting a Bruntons self feathering propeller which apparently "likes" RH rather than LH on fin keeled boats for no apparent reason. It will increase the hull speed by 1 to 1.5 knots under sail and no whirring noises.. :D ...and little or no stuffing box wear.. :D

This is the first time I have heard of the calorifier giving trouble. Do you think it may be due to climate / Temperature ?

Very interesting to hear from you. Let us all keep in touch.

Saludos Cordiales,

Albert

(Alberto el Esperto. :lol: )
Hola Alberto,

I have a bit of a squirter on the teak on the cockpit hatch that leads into what I call the garden shed. I replaced the headliners throughout about 6 years ago but what I should have done at the same time was put styrofoam insulation in the back of all the lockers. The standard lining in the cabin seems to be adequate (just) in keeping out the condensation but the lockers and behind the bunks are a disaster....I am currently working on that problem. Had to double glaze the windows... used that clingfilm stuff held clear of the alloy with draught excluder stuff, looks a trifle rough but works.

I must say that after 4 years in a cold wet climate away from any yard my boat is looking a bit shabby but most everything works and down there you need to carry a spare of every single bit you can think of, I am also slowly getting my head around the concept of programmed maintainence and replacing things that may not need replacing. Last year for instance was the year of the pump... engine bilge pump diaphragm failed , FW pressure pump end assembly failed, both galley foot pump diaphragms failed , both sump pumps in the heads and both pumps on the heads themselves replaced, the bearings on the engine FW circ pump failed and pump replaced and the seals on the raw water pump on the back of the engine needed replacing. I think that 20 years is the life of this kit.

The calorifier? Don't think it would be due to temp...maybe water quality over the years, I don't know if they have anodes in those things or not...first manifests itself as a very occasional cycling of the pressure pump.

The ice isn't a really big deal although a piece the size of a football can give you a nasty knock. Normally the only time you are dealing with the nasty stuff is if you go up to a glacier. That said there is a photo of mine at panaramio of some fairly big ice in Canal Wide where it is a known hazard to big ships.

Other than that in winter you can find light sheet in some of the anchorages that have a lot of fresh coming into them and I wouldn't like to tackle anything thicker than 10mm and maybe not even that.

Its a pity we don't have a photo gallery here, I'd post a pic of the pipe that failed on the engine.

What were you doing at sea? I'm not all that long retired after 42 years.

Salud
Frank

Albert
Posts: 171
Joined: Sat May 12, 2007 9:48 pm
Anti Spam measure: No
AntiSpam Text: ideasnot
Location: Gibraltar.

Post by Albert » Wed Sep 19, 2007 8:59 pm

Hola Frank,
I have just two hours ago returned from the Southampton Boat Show. I was given complimentary tickets and went with a friend who skippered Hitler's yacht that was siezed at the end of the war by the Royal Navy and included in their sailing club for many years.

The big surprise was that I met a couple of exhibitors I have not seen for the better part of 15 years and they recognised me immediately and addressed me by my name. I was gobsmacked.

I can tell you there were lots of sailing boats on display and of a wide array of tonnages but nowadays everything looks plastic and the interiors are styled to look more like mobile homes than shiplike.

I have in my inventory somewhere in one of the boxes a very small rotary dimmer for use in reducing the brilliance of the compass light, but can I find it ? No. I could not find one single exhibitor that had one. So I shall have to revert to "mining" to find it.

This business of the pump failures is very extraordinary. I have only had problems with impellors and electric motor brushes, and these are available as spare parts which I also have buried deep in one of the boxes.

The shower pump in both the forward heads and aft heads on the Sealord were installed by Westerly upside down by the way, by oversight. It is best to reverse them although you will need longer plastic pipe to do so.

About all the other pumps I don't know, but I will bear in mind what you mention and will make a point of paying careful attention to the lot of them.I will be in a better position to discuss these when I get my hands on the boat which I expect to be in February in the new year.

I am amazed to hear you have squirts in the big locker lid. I will make enquiries as to how this can be treated and will come back to you.

I am not surprised you have condensation problems at the back of lockers given the temperatures. There is a report somewhere of styrofoam treatment and I will try to find it and pass it on. Probably you would alleviate this if you had air heating perhaps, to mitigate the chill ?

When I sailed the Baltic the ice thickness was about one inch and my ship ploughed through it effortlessly and when I was off watch I would go up to the bow to look over to watch the ice crumpling and making a loud crackling sound as we steamed.

I went into the Merchant Marine because I originally qualified for a Yachtmaster Ocean ticket, in 1974. In those days it was a Board of Trade Ticket and the syllabus was really extensive and the standard quite strict.
At that time they had a shortage of navigating officers for middle sea routes and I was offered to sail the Baltic as a deck officer which I snapped up, to get experience from a big ship point of view which was very valuable to me and has always stood me in good stead when sailing, something that many yachtsmen do not have practical experience of.

I am now semi retired and have lots of time to devote to Sealording. I have just sold my house in the UK and moving overseas soon so I am in the throes of packing and it is amazing what you accumulate over the years. Let's just keep in touch.

Saludos Cordiales.

Albert.
Albert

Post Reply