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Fulmar and older Westerlies will become classics.

Posted: Wed Mar 02, 2016 12:18 am
by Jolly Roger
Dave Hardy of Trafalgar Yacht Services says Westerly's from the 1960's and 1970's will become classics, but the Fulmar is the most likely due to its design by Ed Dubois. An interesting video interview:

https://youtu.be/OmKdPsHIXwY

I am biased towards the Fulmar and strongly agree.

Re: Fulmar and older Westerlies will become classics.

Posted: Wed Mar 02, 2016 4:20 pm
by TyroSailor
I can't imagine that the Centaur won't :) If it hasn't already. How old does it have to be?

Re: Fulmar and older Westerlies will become classics.

Posted: Wed Mar 02, 2016 5:37 pm
by Jolly Roger
My opinion is the Fulmar is certainly going to be a classicas it has already been in that category in Sailing Today.

I also think the Centaur and Konsort, and possibly Berwick will also reach classic status.

Does it matter? No, as we buy boats we like and can afford. There are lovers of wooden boats (not all of those can really be called classics), long keel boats, cruising boats, racing boats, bilge keel boats, etc.

Will being called a classic really matter? Well maintained examples will command good prices, but those in poor condition will doubfully benefit unless someone can restore it to a high standard by being time generous and cash poor. I can remember back in the mid 1960's when you could buy a Thames Barge in sailing condition for £4,000 (about the cost of a new 30 ft yacht), yet they are now highly prized. It all depends on fashion at the time. Many other goods have prices that have been very low and now are very high. Unfortunatyely for yachts this is unlikely to occur as the overall demand for ownership is in decline due to cheap chartering in warmer climates and then the added costto keep of berthing/storing plus maintaining. By comparison a car is relatively cheap to store compared to a yacht and there are plenty of events for people to show them off. Yachts in private ownership are generally only put on show to other owners - not the general public. That is a real difference at encouraging people to become owners. Most people learn to drive for getting from A to B, but owning a yacht is far more complex and takes time to fully learn all the basics.

What does anyone else think?