Hello from a new Centaur owner.

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Kutassy
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Hello from a new Centaur owner.

Post by Kutassy » Wed Aug 26, 2015 4:37 pm

Hello

A new owner here. Waiting on the September offer to take up full Membership but looking forward to it.

Our boat is based near Torpoint and I'm sure we'll have lots and lots of newbie questions. Not a whole deal of sailing experience, dinghy sailing as a youngster, numerous days out in an elderly Silhouette, again as a youngster, and some more recent cross Channel sailing-experience charter days.

Hope I can do her justice, keep her safe and get her going.

Regards

Jon
Jon
Centaur Sail#1962 "FREE"
Torpoint
http://sailing-free.co.uk

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Re: Hello from a new Centaur owner.

Post by TyroSailor » Wed Aug 26, 2015 5:49 pm

Welcome, Jon :-)

I've not been here long myself - bought Centaur 1361 in the spring and still trying to get her engine to work. Everyone I talk to tells me they're great boats, so I'm looking forward to being able to sail her - as, I daresay, are you. There's a vast wealth of experience and expertise here!
Experience: That which would have been most useful five minutes before you acquired it.

Steve
Tyro (Centaur 1361)
at Southampton

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Re: Hello from a new Centaur owner.

Post by Jolly Roger » Wed Aug 26, 2015 10:03 pm

Welcome Jon.

Wise choice of boat for your level of experience. Sailing from Torpoint should make learning how she handles a joy.

We will be ready for your questions as they arise, so do not worry asking stupid questions - we get them all the time.

Just roll on September and get sailing.
Roger
Concerto Fulmar FR38
Photos at http://s1294.photobucket.com/user/Conce ... 2/library/

Kutassy
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Re: Hello from a new Centaur owner.

Post by Kutassy » Tue Sep 01, 2015 11:21 am

Thanks for the Welcome.

Well we spent the weekend at the boat and began to get familiar with her. Maybe she is known to some of you here? She is Sail Number 1962, named 'Free" formerly named "Woodstock" is my understanding.

We spent the weekend cleaning. Then Bank Holiday Monday stranded on her as we naively misjudged the tide. Luckily the previous owner had left a bottle of spring water on her some years previously, together with a tin of pineapple chunks and some mackerel fillets in tomato sauce. It's not a culinary combination to be sniffed at! Still it could have been worse - we were very nearly stranded in the dinghy some 10 feet from the boat and 50 feet from the shore (without pineapple chunks!). However some rodeo-esque ropework eventually lassoed the boat (but only after flinging 20 failed attempts worth of mud over yesterday's cleaning) and we dragged ourselves over the mud back to the boat. Still the sun was out and it let me spend some time on the electrics.

We did manage to motor the boat out and play with the sails. I've never sailed a boat where the foresail doesn't clear the mast before so we'll have to practice winding the Genoa in on every tack. (That IS what you have to do I suppose?)

And if we can reduce the raising of the mainsail to a one-man task that'd be good too. Roller boom furling is a bit of a weird one to be honest - we seem to keep getting the sail track clips caught up at the mast. Can you leave the Sail Batons in whilst furling or is it just Not Done?

There's loads of jobs on the list - one of the most pressing one being the heads sea-cock is seized shut. Or certainly too stiff to open by hand. I didn't want to take anything beefier to it than my rather puny biceps as I had visions of it breaking off and letting the sea in... WD40 is the first thing to try - but any other suggestions welcome!

Jon
Jon
Centaur Sail#1962 "FREE"
Torpoint
http://sailing-free.co.uk

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aquaplane
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Re: Hello from a new Centaur owner.

Post by aquaplane » Tue Sep 01, 2015 10:18 pm

Kutassy wrote:
We did manage to motor the boat out and play with the sails. I've never sailed a boat where the foresail doesn't clear the mast before so we'll have to practice winding the Genoa in on every tack. (That IS what you have to do I suppose?)

Naa, you tack and when the boat's head comes through the wind you let the wind blow the sail to the other side then sheet in. If there isn't enough wind to blow the sail through or the sheets catch in the baby stay someone may have to go forward and "walk" the clew round.

And if we can reduce the raising of the mainsail to a one-man task that'd be good too. Roller boom furling is a bit of a weird one to be honest - we seem to keep getting the sail track clips caught up at the mast. Can you leave the Sail Batons in whilst furling or is it just Not Done?

Even with roller boom reefing you should normally leave the sliders in the sail track when dropping the main, you only remove the sliders when you put a reef in.

There's loads of jobs on the list - one of the most pressing one being the heads sea-cock is seized shut. Or certainly too stiff to open by hand. I didn't want to take anything beefier to it than my rather puny biceps as I had visions of it breaking off and letting the sea in... WD40 is the first thing to try - but any other suggestions welcome!

Boiling water on rags wrapped round the seacock, repeatedly until it gets warm, then try again. If that doesn't work get more pineapple chunks and mackerel fillets and dry out for a tide. Remove the two bolts from the top of the clamp holding the cone in and go over the side and gently, I did say gently, tap the cone out with a piece of wood, a hammer handle would work if you stick the handle up in the cone and tap the head end. Have a soft wood plug handy just in case you don't shift the cone before you burst the top off the cone. Some heat to warm up the metal work could help with this too.

Jon
Welcome to the forum and Westerly ownership, the learning curve starts off steep but should get shallower as you learn more.

Google Blakes seacock service : http://www.equipment.ath.cx/instrument_ ... acocks.pdf
Bob.
Centaur now sold. Boating from Tarbert.

Kutassy
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Re: Hello from a new Centaur owner.

Post by Kutassy » Wed Sep 02, 2015 9:29 am

Thanks for the reply and advice. Will try the hot water this weekend. I also have one of those gas soldering irons on board - that might heat it up if used sparingly.
Jon
Centaur Sail#1962 "FREE"
Torpoint
http://sailing-free.co.uk

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Re: Hello from a new Centaur owner.

Post by Uncle Albert » Wed Sep 02, 2015 11:42 am

Re the tacking of genoa. There are some plastic wheels (Google, sail chafe protector) which clip onto the baby stay which assist in the 'flow of the sail over the stay. They tend to last only a season or so but I believe that the do help and are worth while.
Uncle Albert
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Re: Hello from a new Centaur owner.

Post by TyroSailor » Wed Sep 02, 2015 2:42 pm

You can leave the battens in when reefing the main, even when rolling it round the boom, as long as you ensure that they remain parallel to the boom when doing so. Otherwise you risk breaking them or damaging the sail. However, my personal preference is for slab reefing - there's less to go wrong and you don't need any special gear. And, most importantly you can get a better shape to the reefed sail, without the boom drooping. And you can still use the kicking strap. You do need the cringles in the luff and leech though, which might not be there if the sail was designed for roller reefing.

Singlehanded raising the main should be OK - make sure the halyard's correctly bent on before you slip; take off all but one sail tie; slack the sheet; motor gently into the wind and then (crucial bit) nip forward, taking off the last tie as you go and haul on the halyard before the head blows off. If the halyard's led back to the cockpit you can steer with your knees while you haul and the whole job is easier.
Dropping it is another matter.
If you have an autopilot...
Experience: That which would have been most useful five minutes before you acquired it.

Steve
Tyro (Centaur 1361)
at Southampton

Kutassy
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Re: Hello from a new Centaur owner.

Post by Kutassy » Wed Sep 02, 2015 2:46 pm

I think the autopilot IS working - that makes everything so much easier! That will be the way to go until I'm less frantic about it all!

Thank you all for the replies.
Jon
Centaur Sail#1962 "FREE"
Torpoint
http://sailing-free.co.uk

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