I was a Westerly virgin

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laurencekillick
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I was a Westerly virgin

Post by laurencekillick » Thu Apr 09, 2015 11:37 am

We have just bought our first Westerly – a Mk 1 Griffon called Willow of Mylor. She was previously in the ownership of a WOA member so it is possible that she is known to some of you. Currently lying on the East coast but we’ll be bringing her round to Chichester harbour in the next couple of weeks.

I have a couple of questions that I hope someone may be able to help me with.

The boat has a spinnaker pole fitting (a single ring) on the front face of the mast and I would like to either change it for a track or add another ring lower than the existing one. However, the last time I drilled into the front face of a mast I went straight into a loom of wires and destroyed radar, vhf and wind speed cables. An expensive mistake. Does the mast section for the Griffon have a cable duct on the inside of the front face?

While working on the boat ashore I became concerned that the combined weight of my partner and me working together at either extremity of the boat might lead to the boat tipping forward onto her bow or back onto her rudder. Was this just another case of mild hysteria by me or is that a real risk?

I have to replace the headlining from bow to stern – a job I am dreading. Any advice or tips on this would be most welcome.

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rhumlady
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Re: I was a Westerly virgin

Post by rhumlady » Thu Apr 09, 2015 5:23 pm

Hi and welcome to the group. If there is a conduit down the inside of the mast you will see pairs of pop rivets at regular spacing down the length of the mast. That doesn't mean previous owners or people they have employed will have used it as it can sometimes be tricky to get cables into the conduit. As far as tipping is concerned I guess you have a bilge keel version and I don't think you need worry too much. I remember this subject came up a few years ago in relation to the Centaur and the consensus was not to worry. You could always put a support at each end if you feel like it.
Derek
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Re: I was a Westerly virgin

Post by aquaplane » Thu Apr 09, 2015 8:17 pm

Happy new boat and welcome to the forum.

I don't think you should have any problems with the boat tipping either, based on my experience with our Centaur.

The headlining is a job I'm avoiding with good reason. There is loads of info on what to do though so searching this and other forums should answer all the questions you can think of and quite a few you hadn't.

What mast is on a Griffon? More to the point what make is yours? My new Z Spars mast looks like this inside:

Image

the main sail track is on the left. It looks like the conduits slide up ridges in the mast extrusion which I hadn't noticed before. The conduit on the right isn't on the leading edge of the mast by the look of it.

The Proctor mast didn't have cable conduits inside it. The halyards were external so no chance of them chaffing on the cables though so probably no need for conduits.

Image

HTH.
Bob.
Centaur now sold. Boating from Tarbert.

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Re: I was a Westerly virgin

Post by Jolly Roger » Thu Apr 09, 2015 10:25 pm

Welcome laurencekillick to the world of Westerly ownership.

Hope you get fair winds on your trip to Chichester. Do let us know how you get on.

You may be able to check for a conduit by using some stiff wire (coat hanger) inserted though a halyard hole. Check to see if there are any suitable holes. Then by carefully moving the end of the wire across the area of interest you should be able to feel if there is a conduit. The other alternative is to use a USB endoscope like http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Mini-5-5mm-HD ... 1c50f00407. Could also have other uses on board like checking the prop in the water or checking difficult access places.

It is unlikely that you would tip your boat on to the rudder or drop the bow. You can easily put a couple of wooden support props if you are concerned.

Headling kits are available from Hawke House, the original suppliers to Westerly. http://www.hawkehouse.co.uk/misc/griffon-kits.html It does seem a lot of money, but the end results are worth it.

Hope this helps and do ask further questions or search the forum.
Roger
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Photos at http://s1294.photobucket.com/user/Conce ... 2/library/

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Re: I was a Westerly virgin

Post by laurencekillick » Fri Apr 10, 2015 8:59 am

Thank you for the information and the pics. I shall check the mast for signs of pop rivets.
I am not sure what the make of the spar is but all the halyards exit on sheaves at the base of the mast so exploring with a length of wire is not going to be possible.
The endoscope may work though.

As far as the tipping goes my concern was more for when I am on board on a drying mooring with no easy method of propping the bow and stern but I am somewhat reassured by the comments above.

I am looking forward to Westerly ownership. Over the years I have been rather sniffy about the marque but, as with all prejudices, this was based on nothing more than my own stupidity. Now that I own one and am close to sailing her for the first time I find the heart beating just a little faster and am at that point in the ownership cycle where every friend and relative is obliged to be bored stiff with endless pictures of the latest addition to the family.

I will post a brief account of the trip home, Burnham to Dover - Dover to Newhaven - Newhaven to Chichester. By the time I arrive I should have a fair idea of exactly what we have bought.

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Re: I was a Westerly virgin

Post by Big-Bang1 » Sat Apr 11, 2015 12:36 pm

If the old headlining is still up I would visit a local motor factors or automotive paint shop and buy a couple of light spray suits, a couple of dust masks and a pair of goggles. The dust and debris from the old backing is vile and gets every where, once you start and realise how grotty it is you will quickly become less interested in finishing the job. With an all in one spray over suit (including hood) mask and goggles you feel kind of immune to the stuff and just get on with it - at least that's what I found.
I would also recommend picking up 5 litres of automotive brake cleaner - it cleans up all sorts, gets oil stains out of bilges and degreases before applying any sort of adhesive - although only use with a mask on, good ventilation and after reading the health and safety guidance on the tin as it's pretty strong stuff but not as nasty as acetone thinners.

Hope this helps a bit and good luck with your new boat - I'm sure she'll be kind on your journey home.
CR2163

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Re: I was a Westerly virgin

Post by rhumlady » Sat Apr 11, 2015 3:48 pm

I use 3M dust masks which come in around £15 but will last some time. The filters are non replaceable but a quick pass with a vacuum cleaner keeps them going. No fumes or dust get through.
Derek
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Re: I was a Westerly virgin

Post by philipstevens » Sat Apr 11, 2015 8:49 pm

Copied from http://tomahawk25.co.uk/wordpress/wp-co ... Malibu.pdf

"[***Health warning : It is very important to wear a full dust mask when grinding or power sanding grp as the fine dust generated is a carcinogen. It’s also good to have a portable vacuum cleaner on board, and clean up as you go along.]"

...as has been advised above - by those who have done it!!
regards,
Philip.
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Re: I was a Westerly virgin

Post by rhumlady » Sun Apr 12, 2015 1:48 pm

Fully agree Phillip, once you start doing anything like sanding or grinding you are going to be in an area with lots of dust in very short order. I generally do an area then go out and let the dust settle before cleaning up. It settles quite quickly.
Derek
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laurencekillick
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Re: I was a Westerly virgin

Post by laurencekillick » Mon Apr 13, 2015 4:48 pm

Thank you for the advice. I love the idea of an over-suit with mask and goggles but there is no danger of starting and not finishing. A Higher Power will see to that.

I now have crew lined up and a date early in May for the trip to the south coast just in time for the Met office to forecast the hottest spring and summer for years. Can't wait.

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