Typhoon

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simonpetrel
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Typhoon

Post by simonpetrel » Tue Mar 25, 2014 5:43 pm

I had a Storm until 2007 when my wife sold as I had contracted septicemia. I am finally well enough to think about another boat. We loved the Storm for its sailing performance but we need something for serious cruising. Everyone tells me the Typhoon is a big Storm! Can anyone help me with some questions?
Can you make the rig more flexible with a baby stay and staysail - maybe go the whole hog with a short sprit with Yankee and stay? How about twin forestays for downwind sails.
Is the standard Volvo 28 sufficient? My wife thought the 22 in the Storm too weak.
People tell me that the aft cabin is too small for a live aboard. Is that the case?

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Simon

Vegable
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Location: Abersoch; N.Wales, Boat back in Arisaig.

Re: Typhoon

Post by Vegable » Sun Mar 30, 2014 12:05 pm

As no-one's replied I have a limited experiance with a Typoon.
I sailed with a friend of mine from Dublin to Plymouth via the Scillys and again from Plymouth to Saint Malo via the Channel Isles. I have an Oceanranger (an extended Corsair) and can offer a comparison.
The Typhoon was designed as a cruiser/racer so has a lot of rigging tweeky bits to play with. If you want a boat purely for cruising then I suggest the Corsair/Oceanranger/Oceanlord etc boats. On my Oceanranger I do find that the boat is underpowered with the 30HP engine and I also have a Brunston Folding prop and assume it'll be similar in the Typhoon (only a foot difference). My friend had an inner forestay fitted for a storm jib but they never used it, neither did they use twin foresails for down wind sailing.
I can't comment at all about the various sail plans you're proposing as I've no experience with them.
The aft cabin is definately too small and a bit pokey for live aboard and once again I suggest the above boats would be better. The Typhoon has wide decks so consequently there is less cabin space inside which you might find restricting. When we went to the Channel Isles etc there were 3 couples on board and space was definately limited both in moving about and storing clothing.
I did find that the Typhoon was wonderfully responsive at the helm, an absolute dream to sail and went like a rocket - better than my boat, but for my sort of sailing - leisurely cruising the Oceanranger is wonderful and is ideal for 4 people to cruise together in comfort.
When I changed from my Renown I originally went after a Typhoon but after accidentally viewing the Oceanranger I was hooked and am very glad I went that way. Incidentally my friend has sold his share in the Typhoon and has bought a Corsair.
Of course, it's horses for courses and I hope this has helped a bit.
Mike
"There is nothing worse than running ashore, unless you are uncertain as to which continent that shore belongs"

mikebuggy
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Re: Typhoon

Post by mikebuggy » Mon Mar 31, 2014 7:21 pm

Hi,

I too was looking to upgrade from a Storm to a Typhoon, or Corsair, but just happened on an Oceanranger....and I'm very happy I did. A very comfortable and roomy boat, and with the right sails, and sailed well, is surprisingly fast. She often manages 160 to 170 mile days on long offshore passages (average 7 kts) and once managed over 187! Because they are reasonably heavy boats its best to stick with a standard (ie not in mast furling) main, preferable with a largish roach and fully battened. Also a good powerful genoa. I have an extra inner forestay that can be set up for the hank-on heavy weather sails, and also carry a standard and an assymetric spinnaker with snuffer. The mast has a separate storm trysail track. I have fitted the mast with kevlar running backstays in order to stiffen the rig and this works a treat. There is a terrific amount of room below, and great storage. The navigator/skipper gets to have his/her own dedicated pilot-berth, which is great when sailing long distance with a watchkeeping crew. They are also very good comfortable sea-boats. Mine has carried me safely on 2 Transatlantic journeys and 3 Azores-UK legs.
I have to say the Typhoon is a very nice looking boat, and Iwould say great for fast cruising in all conditions....but for endurance blue-water living, the Oceanranger (or Sealord, slightly larger but very similar) have the edge.
Good luck with your search.

mikebuggy
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Re: Typhoon

Post by mikebuggy » Mon Mar 31, 2014 7:26 pm

Sorry, forgot to add to the foregoing:
Yes the Oceanranger is greatly underpowered with the VP2003. But note that Some had the more powerful turbo version, sometimes also fitted to the Sealord and Oceanlord.
I have now changed my engine to a 4 cyl Beta 38 with a featherstream prop (was a VP2003 with a Brunton A/P). The combination is now perfect and we can get through the chop much better. I sold the VP2003 to a Typhoon owner!!

simonpetrel
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Re: Typhoon

Post by simonpetrel » Wed Apr 02, 2014 7:25 pm

Thank you very much to both vegable and mike buggy for their very sensible and useful comments. Butch Watkins went for a corsair and he also swore by her. I'll start checking the websites for corsairs/ocean rangers & quests tonight! Thanks again simonpetrel

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